Archive for the ‘1927’ Category

‘Only Say That You’ll Be Mine . . .’

Friday, November 1st, 2013

When one wanders through the vast field of American folk songs – the songs that arose here in the years before recorded music, that folks sang at home and passed on via oral traditions, and that provide at least part of the foundation of today’s popular music – one finds mayhem of all sorts. Take a listen to numerous entries, for example, in Harry Smith’s massive Anthology of American Folk Music, and you’ll find jealousy, robbery, rape, accidental death, murder and more.

At least two of those are present in “Down On The Banks Of The Ohio” as recorded in 1936 by the Blue Sky Boys. The song wasn’t included in Smith’s original three volumes in 1952 (reissued in 1997 in a six-CD box), but it showed up in a 2000 release of a fourth volume Smith never completed. In that song – released on the Bluebird and Montgomery Ward labels (and used in 1973 in the soundtrack to the movie Paper Moon) – the Blue Sky Boys sing:

Come my love, let’s take a walk,
Just a little ways away.
While we walk along, we’ll talk,
Talk about our wedding day.

Only say that you’ll be mine,
And in our home we’ll happy be.
Down beside where the waters flow.
Down on the banks of the Ohio.

I drew my knife across her throat,
And to my breast she gently pressed.
“Oh please, oh please, don’t murder me,
For I’m unprepared to die you see.”

I taken her by her lily white hand.
I let her down and I bade her stand.
There I plunged her in to drown,
And watched her as she floated down.

Returning home ’tween twelve and one.
Thinking of the deed I done.
I murdered a girl I love, you see,
Because she would not marry me.

Only say that you’ll be mine,
And in our home we’ll happy be.
Down beside where the waters flow.
Down on the banks of the Ohio.

Next day as I returning home
I met the sheriff standing in the door.
He said “Young man, come with me and go,
Down to the banks of the Ohio.”

Only say that you’ll be mine,
And in our home we’ll happy be.
Down beside where the waters flow.
Down on the banks of the Ohio.

The song, according to Wikipedia, comes from the 19th century, and many versions with different verses have arisen since. In the first recorded version of the tune, performed in 1927 by Red Patterson’s Piedmont Log Rollers, the young lady confesses that she loves another, and that spurs the narrator to murder. In that 1927 version, however, the sheriff makes no appearance, leaving the murderer to grieve on the banks of the river.

Okay, so jealousy and murder were not uncommon in song (and still are not, perhaps especially in county music, the most direct descendant of the folk songs Smith collected), but it was still startling to see earlier this week in the Billboard Hot 100 from October 30, 1971, that Olivia Newton-John had a hit with a gender-flipped version of “Banks Of The Ohio.” The single went only to No. 94 here in the U.S. (No. 34 on the Adult Contemporary chart), but it was No. 1 for five weeks in Australia. Here’s a 1971 television appearance:

Newton-John’s version trims out the verses that provide motive for the murder, that tell of the drowning and that bring in the sheriff, yet it’s still a jarring song for 1971 when one listens to the story. Well, maybe not; 1971 was also the year that the Buoys hit No. 17 with “Timothy,” a barely disguised tale about a cave-in and cannibalism. But I wonder how many folks who sang along with the pretty chorus of Newton-John’s hit shook their heads when they realized that things were not as pleasant as they seemed along the banks of the Ohio.

Newton-John’s version of the song is the only one that’s hit the Billboard Hot 100 and AC Top 40. No version has ever reached the R&B or Country Top 40s. Finding it in the R&B listings would have surprised me, but a greater surprise was its absence from the country chart. In the years before and after Newton-John’s cover of the song, there have been plenty of other countryish covers, both as “Banks Of The Ohio” and “Down On The Banks Of The Ohio.” (Wikipedia notes a couple other titles, too: Henry Whittier recorded the song in the 1920s as “I’ll Never Be Yours,” and the song has sometimes been titled “On the Banks of the Old Pedee.”)

As I wandered through numerous covers of “Banks Of The Ohio” in the past few days (and I won’t note all of them; you can go to Second Hand Songs and find the list I used as a starting point if you’re so inclined), a few stood out. I liked the version by Howard & Gerald with the Starlite Mountain Boys that was released in 1970 on Mountain Doer (or Mo Do) Records of Marion, West Virginia. The same was true of the version the Kossoy Sisters included on their 1956 album, Bowling Green and Other Folk Songs from the Southern Mountains. And a current artist named Tom Roush recorded a very lush take on the song for his album My Grandfather’s Clock: More Music of 19th Century America, released just this year.

But the most fascinating version of the old song I’ve found in the past few days comes from a very familiar artist. The person who posted it on YouTube called it “the creepiest version” of the song, and I can’t disagree. Here, from his 1957 album, Come Sit By My Side, and studded with dissonance, is Glenn Yarbrough’s take on “Banks Of The Ohio.”

‘Let Me Be Your Little Dog . . .’

Thursday, September 22nd, 2011

A good portion of yesterday evening was spent sifting through a new two-CD package that the mailman dropped off yesterday: The Legendary Story of Sun Records, a collection of sixty tracks from the legendary Memphis-based label created by Sam Phillips.

Among the tunes that popped up was “Matchbox,” a 1957 recording written and performed by Carl Perkins. Here’s a video that honestly confounds me.

The recording used for the video is different and longer than the track included in the CD package I got yesterday (and which I am unable to post in a video). I’m under the impression from the CD notes that the shorter version – it runs 2:10 – is the original. So is the track used in the video a live performance cleaned up immensely well (something I doubt strongly), or is it an alternate studio recording merged moderately well with a lip-synched television visual? Or is it the original? Does anyone out there know?

Anyway, most sources agree that the song was written in the studio during December 1956, when Perkins’ father, Buck, suggested the younger Perkins record “Match Box Blues,” a song written and recorded in 1927 by Texan bluesman Blind Lemon Jefferson. The line around which Perkins’ song coalesced was the now famous “I’m sitting here wonderin’, will a matchbox hold my clothes?”

The line, which starts Jefferson’s 1927 version, had originated before that: Wikipedia notes that Ma Rainey had sung the line in her 1923 recording of “Lost Wandering Blues,” and notes further that both Jefferson and Rainey had likely absorbed the line from earlier usages, as was common in the folk and blues idioms.

However the line may have originated, Perkins used it and the companion line that Jefferson wrote as the starting point to his song:

I’m sittin’ here wonderin’, will a matchbox hold my clothes?
I’m sittin’ here wonderin’, will a matchbox hold my clothes?
I ain’t got no matches and I got a long way to go.

Sun released Perkins’ recording as a single, but the record did not make the Billboard Hot 100. (It’s listed in Joel Whitburn’s Top Pop Singles as a “Classic Non-Hot 100 Song,” with an additional notation that the record has been honored by the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame.)

Since then, Perkins’ tune has been recorded multitudes of times. All-Music Guide lists nearly six hundred CDs that include a version of the song. Many of those are Perkins’ versions – based on album titles and running times, there are several alternates and numerous live versions out there as well as the original Sun single release – but many others are covers by artists as diverse as Johnny Rivers, Ronnie Hawkins, the Deighton Family, Jerry Lee Lewis,* Ike Turner, Sleepy LaBeef, Billy Swan, the Paramounts and more.

The cover version I heard first, though, was by the Beatles. Released in England as one of the four tracks on the “Long Tall Sally” EP, “Matchbox” came out in the U.S. as a Capitol single and went to No. 17 during the autumn of 1964. It was also included on the LP Something New, one of the hodgepodge albums Capitol was in the habit of creating for the U.S. market.

But as much as I loved the Beatles’ studio version of the tune during the days when I was exploring the band’s music, I find myself more intrigued these days by the live version the band performed during one of its shows aired over the British Broadcasting Corporation. This version comes from the July 10, 1963, performance and was included on the 1994 release Live at the BBC.

*Lewis was in the studio when Perkins wrote the song and played on the original recording. (Wikipedia says Lewis provided a piano boogie rhythm that spurred Perkins’ writing.) I have a suspicion that he also played on the longer version used to back the Perkins video above.