Wishbone Ash? Entirely Possible

Following Tuesday’s post about long-ago beerball games while on the staff of KVSC-FM, St. Cloud State’s student radio station (and following as well an exchange of comments with long-time reader and pal Yah Shure), I got to thinking about what we beerball players might have heard when we tuned our portable radios to our own station.

Our format was pretty freeform. As I look back, it seems that as long as it could be somehow classified as rock, as long as it wasn’t in the Top 40 and as long as it wasn’t obscene, it could get on the air at KV. A lot of the tunes we played came from the deejays’ own record collections, and I recall seeing a lot of album covers that I did not recognize coming in and out of our studios. Over the years, most of those unknown jackets have become more familiar, and in many cases, so has the music inside. Given the eclectic tastes our deejays had, though, there are likely a few that I still wouldn’t know.

One that I would know, however, is Argus by Wishbone Ash. I recall being intrigued more than once that spring when I saw the album’s striking cover in the KV offices and studios. As it happens, the album came out during the first week of May in 1972, according to All-Music Guide. That means that it’s entirely possible that a track from the album was on the air as most of KVSC’s staffers wobbled through a late spring-quarter game of Buckhorn-fueled beerball forty years ago. So here’s “Warrior” from Wishbone Ash.

(Time is in short supply this morning; I hope to be back tomorrow.)

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6 Responses to “Wishbone Ash? Entirely Possible”

  1. Paco Malo says:

    Well you can’t turn him into a company man
    You can’t turn him into a whore
    And the boys upstairs just don’t understand anymore
    Well the top brass don’t like him talking so much
    And he won’t play what they say to play
    And he don’t want to change what don’t need to change

    And there goes the last DJ
    Who plays what he wants to play
    And says what he wants to say
    Hey, hey, hey
    And there goes your freedom of choice
    There goes the last human voice
    There goes the last DJ

    Well some folks say they’re gonna hang him so high
    Because you just can’t do what he did
    There’s some things you just can’t put in the minds of those kids
    As we celebrate mediocrity, all the boys upstairs want to see
    How much you’ll pay for what you used to get for free

    And there goes the last DJ
    Who plays what he wants to play
    And says what he wants to say
    Hey, hey, hey
    And there goes your freedom of choice
    There goes the last human voice
    And there goes the last DJ

    Well he got him a station down in Mexico
    And sometimes it will kinda come in
    And I’ll bust a move and remember how it was back then

    There goes the last DJ
    Who plays what he wants to play
    And says what he wants to say
    Hey, hey, hey
    And there goes your freedom of choice
    There goes the last human voice
    And there goes the last DJ.”

    (The Last DJ by Tom Petty)

  2. Paco Malo says:

    Pardon my failed attempt to make that a long quote of the lyrics to Tom Petty’s song that your post this morning reminded of.

  3. David says:

    Another album that could have been conceivably have heard at these beerball games was Fleetwood Mac’s “Bare Trees,” released in March 1972, an understated, autumnal album that still has an impact 40 years later (see, e.g., Midlake’s “The Trials of Van Occupanther”). Such sad news about Bob Welch, the guiding force behind that album, who died today of a self-inflicted gunshot wound. http://www.cnn.com/2012/06/07/showbiz/bob-welch-dead/index.html.

    I always thought that the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame did him a great disservice when it failed to induct him in 1998. If Jeremy Spencer and Danny Kirwan are in (meaning that ever lesser lights from the pre-Buckingham/Nicks phase were deemed worthy), surely he should be as well, especially given his importance in keeping Fleetwood Mac together as an ongoing concern during a trying period.

  4. Paco Malo says:

    David, I quite agree about Bob Welch belonging in the Rock ‘n’ Roll Hall of Fame. He gave our generation a lot. When he pulled a “Hemingway” yesterday, it greatly saddened me. But I know now he’s in a better place.

  5. whiteray says:

    @David: I agree as well. As I understand it, there was some legal unpleasantness between Welch and the others in the band at the time of the induction, and Welch at one point thought that resulted in his being left out. But according to Wikipedia, it was evidently a decision of the R&RHOF itself. That was more than tacky. And I agree that “Bare Trees” is one of the classic albums. It’s honestly never far from the CD player here.

  6. David Lenander says:

    Danny Kirwan was not a lesser light of the pre-Buckingham Nicks years, his lyrical guitar leads the band throughout KILN HOUSE, FUTURE GAMES & BARE TREES, and was missed thereafter. And he wrote most of the albums, by the way, including “Bare Trees,” which got a lot of airplay here on the progressive formatted KQRS. But it was Bob Welch’s songs, “Sentimental Lady,” and “Future Games” that first really drew me to FM, the latter when I saw them live, shortly before they fired Kirwan.I think Blue Oyster Cult opened, here in Mpls, summer of ??73. I’m sorry to learn of Welch’s death. Having two lead guitarists made for an interesting band, and I also loved Christine McVie’s singing. I still remember the extended versions of her “Homeward Bound” and Welch’s “Future Games” almost 40 years later. I wish more bands would hold out to have everyone included, like the Dead did.

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