No. 44, Forty-Four Years Ago

We’re in the mood for some Symmetry again, this time heading back to the summer of 1975, one of the great seasons of my life: I spent it clearing my general ed requirements in preparation for graduation from St. Cloud State in February 1976, casting a wide social net, working half-time on a campus-wide audio-visual equipment inventory with my pal Murl and some other good folks, and generally enjoying life in a way I hadn’t for some months.

So how good was the music I heard in the car, sometimes at home, and a lot of time at Atwood Center as I whiled away free time with other summer members of the The Table? Here’s the Billboard Top Ten from August 23, 1975, forty-four years ago tomorrow:

“Fallin’ In Love” by Hamilton, Joe Frank & Reynolds
“One Of These Nights” by the Eagles
“Get Down Tonight” by K.C. & The Sunshine Band
“Jive Talkin’” by the Bee Gees
“Rhinestone Cowboy” by Glen Campbell
“Why Can’t We Be Friends” by War
“How Sweet It Is (To Be Loved By You)” by James Taylor
“Someone Saved My Life Tonight” by Elton John
“At Seventeen” by Janis Ian
“Please Mister Please” by Olivia Newton-John

That’s a decent set, with only one record that I did not – and still do not – care for. “Why Can’t We Be Friends” sounded kind of stupid to me then, and forty-four years of hearing it on occasion have not changed that opinion. I wasn’t crazy about “Rhinestone Cowboy,” but I like it a lot more now. And the James Taylor record is not nearly my favorite of his, but when it pops up on the radio I don’t reach for the buttons.

The rest are all fine listening, some of them favorites. And nine of the ten – even “Why Can’t We Be Friends” – are on the digital shelves. (The only one that wasn’t, surprisingly, was the Elton John single, an oversight that’s being corrected as I write.)

As to the stricter measure I use – checking to see if tracks show up in the iPod – well, six of those records show up at the moment. Those missing are the records by War, James Taylor, Olivia Newton-John and Elton John (and “Someone Saved My Life Tonight” will be in the iPod by the end of the day).

So that’s seven out of ten that I like hearing yet today, and yet, only one of those records actually says “1975” to me when it comes out of the boom box in the kitchen: “At Seventeen” hung around into the autumn and got a lot of play on the juke box across the room from The Table, so that’s often where my mind goes when I hear it.

But what about our other focus for today? What do we find when we drop down that chart from August 23, 1975, to No. 44? What do we find?

Well, we run into a single from Paul McCartney & Wings that was on its way down the chart after having fallen a few spots short of the Top Ten: “Listen To What The Man Said.”

The record, with Tom Scott on saxophone, peaked at No. 1. (Not No. 13; thanks, Yah Shure.) It’s an immediate earworm and a good listen for a Thursday (and it, too, needs to be added to the iPod).

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One Response to “No. 44, Forty-Four Years Ago”

  1. Yah Shure says:

    You had me scratching my head, since I knew “Listen to What The Man Said” had been a #1 (one month earlier, as it turned out.) It was in its 13th *week* on the Hot 100 when it dropped to #44 on 8/25/75. I can still picture that custom black Capitol label on the 45 whenever I hear it, since everybody else on Capitol was still stuck on the orange label, including Glen. I didn’t realize at the time that it was a throwback to the black and silver Capitol label used on 78s in the 1940s.

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