Posts Tagged ‘Ace’

Saturday Single No. 405

Saturday, August 2nd, 2014

I’m feeling old and battered this morning. I had a visit with Dr. Julie yesterday, and today, two new bottles of pills sit on the counter here in the EITW studios: an antibiotic for whatever it is that has annoyed my sinuses and lymph nodes, and a heartburn remedy for the gastric inflammation that’s arisen in the last two weeks.

It seems to be a given in our culture, with its miracle medicines and its resulting reliance on pills (not always a good thing, that last), that the older we get, the more bottles of pills gather on our counters and in our medicine chests. And they’re beginning to accumulate here, which makes me aware – as do a few other things – that in just more than a month, I’ll turn 61.

Still, I have to think myself lucky for at least two reasons: First, my collection of active prescriptions still numbers less than ten, far less than my mother’s current total and far less as well than my father’s total in the months before he passed on eleven years ago. Second, we have decent health insurance, at least as far as prescriptions go; other aspects of our current coverage have not yet, happily, been tested.

As to the “battered” portion of the lead sentence above, well, about two-thirds of the way down the stairs this morning, I stepped on a cat toy and thumped the rest of the way down the stairs on my posterior. That did no favors for any portions of my aging body. And the cats were distinctly unsympathetic. Two of them looked at me as I sat at the bottom of the stairs, shaking my head, and then they headed toward the kitchen and their breakfast.

Ah, well. I broke no bones and pulled no muscles. And if yesterday’s new prescriptions do their work, I should be feeling better in ten days or so. So I’m okay. And having decided that, I made my way through the Billboard files this morning to see if I could find out anything interesting about August 2, and I found a Hot 100 released that day in 1975.

The top five are familiar:

“One Of These Nights” by the Eagles
“I’m Not In Love” by 10 c.c.
“Jive Talkin’” by the Bee Gees
“Please Mister Please” by Olivia Newton-John
“The Hustle” by Van McCoy & The Soul City Symphony

Familiar, inoffensive and not at all inspiring. So, I thought, what about albums? Here are the top five albums from this week in 1975:

One Of These Nights by the Eagles
Love Will Keep Us Together by the Captain & Tenille
The Heat Is On by the Isley Brothers
Captain Fantastic & The Brown Dirt Cowboy by Elton John
Venus & Mars by Wings

All well-known albums, three of them – those by the Eagles, the Isleys and Wings – very good, but again, nothing that inspires this morning (although I suppose I should give another listen to the Elton John album as I’ve read that it’s a great album, which is a judgment I’ve never reached).

So I went back to the August 2, 1975, Billboard Hot 100, turned August 2 in No. 82 and scrolled down the list. And there I came upon a bouncy single titled “Rock & Roll Runaway” by Ace, the British group that in the spring of 1975 had a No. 3 hit with “How Long.” “Runaway” didn’t do nearly as well, peaking at No. 71.

And I wondered how many stations popped the single on their playlists. Probably not many, based on the station surveys available at ARSA. Three stations’ surveys gathered there list the record: WNCI in Columbus, Ohio; KLWN in Lawrence, Kansas; and KLIK in Jefferson City, Missouri, where the record was listed in the “Extras” section.

And that’s all I know. But this morning, it’s enough. So here’s Ace’s “Rock & Roll Runaway,” today’s Saturday Single.

On The High School Jukebox

Tuesday, April 20th, 2010

The tale of the jukebox in the Multi-Purpose Room at St. Cloud Tech in the autumn of 1970 was told here once before: In a time when school schedules were becoming more flexible, the former cold lunch room was renamed, and in an effort to make it more attractive to students for those times when their classes were not meeting, the administration installed a jukebox.

That was a move that I think the authorities eventually regretted, certainly by the second time Dawn’s No. 1 hit “Knock Three Times” drew the attention of some student’s quarter late in the autumn. When Tony Orlando and his crew told us to “knock three times,” feet stomped on the floor and books slammed on the table.  “Twice on the pipe” drew the same reaction.

Not all songs – or very many – created the aural chaos that Dawn’s second hit did. (“Candida” had come around earlier.) But the jukebox made the Multi-Purpose room, obviously, much louder than it had been during its service as a lunchroom. I give that long-gone administration credit for simply closing the doors and letting the music roll. And I wonder if any members of that administration had second thoughts the following spring when various news agencies reported that some radio stations across the U.S. were removing from their playlists – because of its seeming drug references – the Brewer & Shipley hit “One Toke Over The Line.”

The record was popular down in the Multi-Purpose Room that spring, maybe as much because of its buoyant country rock arrangement as its winking and chuckling “toke” reference. As we listened, we often wondered how Michael Brewer and Tom Shipley thought they could get away with it, and we marveled at the fact that – for the most part – they had: The record went to No. 10 in the spring of 1971. And we marveled as well that no one from the Tech administration seemed inclined to call the juke box jobber and demand that the record be pulled from the machine.

The record, as it turned out, was one of those happy accidents that seem to wait to happen. Two quotes from a page about the record at the Brewer & Shipley website make that clear:

Michael Brewer: ‘We wrote that one night in the dressing room of a coffee house. We played there a lot.  We were real bored, sitting in the dressing room.  We were pretty much stoned and all and Tom says, ‘Man, I’m one toke over the line tonight.’ I liked the way that sounded and so I wrote a song around it.  We were literally just entertaining ourselves. The next day we got together to do some picking and said, ‘What was that we were messing with last night?’ We remembered it, and in about an hour, we’d written ‘One Toke Over the Line.’ Just making ourselves laugh, really. We had no idea that it would ever even be considered as a single, because it was just another song to us.”

Tom Shipley: “‘One Toke’ wasn’t meant to make it to record. We were opening for Melanie at Carnegie Hall, and we played two encores. We really didn’t have anything else to sing to them. So we played ‘One Toke,’’ and the audience gave us a standing ovation. The record company president was there, and he said ‘Record it!’”

On the same page at the website, Brewer goes on to note: “The Vice President of the United States, Spiro Agnew, named us personally as a subversive to American youth, but at exactly the same time Lawrence Welk performed the crazy thing . . . That shows how absurd it really is. Of course, we got more publicity than we could have paid for.”

For all of that, and for the fact that just hearing the introduction still brings a smile to my face, “One Toke Over The Line” has a spot in the Ultimate Jukebox.

A Six-Pack from the Ultimate Jukebox, No. 13
“Dirty Water” by the Standells, Tower 185 [1966]
“Everybody Is A Star” by Sly & the Family Stone, Epic 10555 [1970]
“One Toke Over The Line” by Brewer & Shipley, Kama Sutra 516 [1971]
“How Long” by Ace, Anchor 21000 [1975]
“Mainstreet” by Bob Seger, Capitol 4422 [1977]
“(I’ve Had The) Time Of My Life” by Bill Medley & Jennifer Warnes, RCA 5224 [1987]

“Dirty Water” is, of course, a crunchy piece of great garage rock celebrating Boston as the home of lovers, muggers, thieves and those mysterious – to the twelve-year-old whiteray during the summer of 1966 – “frustrated women.” The record went to No. 11 during that summer forty-four years ago, and that single guitar introduction – with the fellows lip-synching here – still grabs hold of a listener and says, “Pay attention! We’re talking about Boston here!”

Having first heard Sly & the Family Stone as the group behind the frenetic “Dance To The Music,”  the winking “Hot Fun in the Summertime” and the funky “Thank You (Falettinme Be Mice Elf Again),” I wasn’t prepared in the autumn of 1970 when I heard the B-Side of that last record on WJON one evening. Sweet, melodic, a little bittersweet and even a little inspirational, “Everybody Is A Star” wasn’t something I would have expected from Sly Stewart and his pals. The record got airplay as the flipside of the No. 1 hit “Thank You,” although the Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits doesn’t give it a ranking of its own. In my own book, though, sweet often outranks funky (not always, but often enough that I recognize the pattern), and “Everybody Is A Star” thus finds its place in the Ultimate Jukebox.

The pulsing bass introduction that kicks off Ace’s “How Long” sounds more foreboding than the song actually is, although a tune in which the narrator quizzes his gal on her infidelity isn’t going to be a chorus of hoots and giggles. The record – which went to No. 3 in the spring of 1975 – was the only hit for the group from Sheffield, England, although the group’s lead singer, Paul Carrack, later reached the charts four times in the 1980s as a member of Mike & The Mechanics. (Ignore, if you can, the video’s picture of Ace Frehley of Kiss.)

I spent a few days the other week reading Late Edition: A Love Story, Bob Greene’s Valentine and eulogy to the newspaper business, framed through his work during his mid-1960s high school and college years for two newspapers in his hometown of Columbus, Ohio. It’s a good read, and I might write about the book itself one of these days, but what made it come to mind this morning was Greene’s tale about a nightspot where he and his pals would sometimes stop. A band of scuffling folks about the same age regularly came down from Detroit to play there, and Greene notes that when the band took its breaks, he often had a chance to talk to the band’s lead singer, a young Bob Seger. The odds of either one of them making it big in their chosen professions were so slender, and Greene’s tale makes me wonder about the odds of both of them succeeding to the degrees they have. “Mainstreet” is the second Seger selection in these lists – after “Night Moves” – and to my ears is the better record, although “Night Moves” packs a stronger emotional wallop. “Mainstreet” also came from the 1976 album Night Moves, and it went to No. 24 in the spring of 1977.

I’m not quite sure what to say about “(I’ve Had The) Time Of My Life,” which came – as most readers likely know – from the 1987 movie Dirty Dancing. A ladyfriend and I saw the movie the first weekend it was released in the autumn of that year. As soon as the movie was over, we wanted the soundtrack and tried to get to any of the several record shops in St. Cloud before they closed for the evening. As it happened, we had to wait until the next day, when we had planned a shopping trip to the Twin Cities. And the record – a ballad that turns into a dance number with hints of gospel (musically if not lyrically) – remains a touchstone for me for the seasons that preceded the film’s release.