Posts Tagged ‘Doobie Brothers’

Saturday Single No. 280

Saturday, March 3rd, 2012

I’m a fact junkie. As I mentioned here at least  once, I spent many of my childhood hours reading our old edition of Compton’s Pictured Encyclopedia. In that same post, I talked about the pleasure I find in paging through the various volumes in my library about record charts. I like reference books.

I used to get a new edition of the World Almanac every few years and browse in it regularly, noting things like the population of Gabon and the winner of the Academy Award for best supporting actor for 1937. But with the advent of Wikipedia and similar sites at my fingertips, it’s been nine years since I bought a new almanac. (The 2003 edition of the World Almanac, as it turns out, places Gabon’s population at 1.2 million in 2001; Wikipedia says it’s currently 1.5 million. The winner of the Academy Award for best supporting actor for 1937 has stayed the same: It was Joseph Schildkraut, for his portrayal of Captain Alfred Dreyfus in the 1936 film The Life of Emile Zola.)

 Even with the availability of multiple reference sources on the ’Net, though, I still page through reference books for pleasure. There’s something about holding a book that I will always like. The Texas Gal recently acquired a Nook Tablet and uses it for everything from reading – she’s currently working her way through the fourth volume of A Song of Ice and Fire by George R.R. Martin – as well as for email, game-playing and ’Net surfing. She’s very pleased with it. I imagine I’ll eventually get one, too, but I think that as I read, I’ll miss an indefinable something that I get when I hold an actual book in my hands.

Still, even though I enjoy the many books I have, I do a lot of my research online, and Wikipedia is one of my favorite stops. It’s not perfect. But with the exception of the occasional sniping about topics currently in the news, it’s generally accurate. So, bereft of a topic for this space when I got up this morning, I stopped by there to see what historical events had occurred on March 3 over the years.

Well, in 1863, Tsar Alexander of Russia liberated the serfs, and in 1905, Tsar Nicholas II agreed to the creation of the Duma, an elected parliamentary body. In 1776, during the American Revolution, the first amphibious landing of the U.S. Marine Corps began the Battle of Nassau.

Time magazine was published for the first time in 1923, and nineteen years earlier, in 1904, Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany had become the first person to ever make a sound recording of a political document, using Thomas Edison’s phonography cylinder to do so.

Also in recording history, on March 3, 1951, Ike Turner and his Rhythm Kings recorded “Rocket 88” in Memphis and then credited the record to Jackie Brenston & His Delta Cats.  (I once wrote at length about “Rocket 88,” debating – and agreeing with – its occasional heralding as the first rock ’n’ roll record as opposed to Fats Domino’s “The Fat Man,” which I’d also seen frequently mentioned for that slot over the years. My readers supplied so many possible alternatives to those two records – all of them legitimate – that I’ve not touched the topic again.)

So what else took place on March 3?

In 1991, by overwhelming majorities, Latvian and Estonians voted for independence from the collapsing Soviet Union. (That collapse is neatly examined in a very good book I finished only recently: Moscow, December 25, 1991: The Last Day of the Soviet Union by Conor O’Clery. Using as his frame the day when the red flag with the hammer and sickle was replaced over the Kremlin by the Russian tricolor, O’Clery tells the stories of Mikhail Gorbachev, Boris Yeltsin and the last years of the U.S.S.R. I recommend it.)

And in 1836, Texans celebrated the signing of their own Declaration of Independence, breaking away from Mexico and creating the Republic of Texas. On occasion, the Texas Gal will remind me that Texas was a nation on its own once, not just some random territory waiting to be made into a state. I nod, acknowledging that Texas is unique (and that holds true in many arenas, not just its political existence).

So, because today is Texas Independence Day, and because my Texas Gal loves it, the Doobie Brothers’ “Texas Lullaby” – from their 1975 album Stampede – is today’s Saturday single.

Another Performer At That Intersection

Tuesday, May 18th, 2010

I don’t know Rosanne Cash’s work all that well. I’ve got a couple of her albums on vinyl and have found a couple of CDs of her recent work, too. I’m still absorbing the work she did on last year’s acclaimed CD, The List, a collection based on a list of one hundred essential American songs her famous father gave her when she was eighteen. In other words, I’ve listened to a fair amount of her music, but I’m no expert, just a fan.

And as I write that, I realize that I’m still absorbing the album that I’ve long thought – from my admittedly limited view – to be Cash’s best: King’s Record Shop from 1987. In a few years, The List may challenge for the top spot in Cash’s catalog, but I think that – as good as last year’s release was (and it was very good indeed) – the best that The List can do for some time is wrestle King’s Record Shop to a draw.

Now, perhaps I think that because King’s Record Shop was the first album by Rosanne Cash I really heard. Before that, I’d likely heard bits and pieces of her work here and there, but I don’t know that I’d considered Cash as someone to take seriously. And – as is true in the case of quite a few performers – it was Dave Marsh’s The Heart of Rock & Soul that persuaded me to listen more closely to Rosanne Cash, when he listed her song “Runaway Train” at No. 590 in his 1989 listing of the top 1,001 singles.

So what did I find when I tracked down King’s Record Shop? Looking back – with the aid of a little bit of listening again last evening – I found a performer and songwriter at that interesting intersection of country, rock, blues and folk, a place where I’ve been pleased to find a fair number of other performers in the past twenty years, maybe chief among them Darden Smith.

My blogging friend Paco Malo once cited in the comments to one of my posts the description given by Levon Helm of The Band of the music he listened to and played growing up in Arkansas. Having lost those comments, I’m paraphrasing, but Helm basically said the music at home was some country, some blues, some gospel, some folk, and they called it rock ’n’ roll. And that was true enough, meaning that Cash and Smith and others at that intersection aren’t creating something new. My point, though, is that for many years as rock, pop and even country music evolved, some of those influences were forgotten or at least at times ignored in mainstream genres. And when I picked up King’s Record Shop not long after reading Marsh’s book, it was, if not quite a revelation, then at least a refreshing reminder of some of the major strains of American popular music.

Now, all that was twenty years ago or so. But King’s Record Shop – along with some of Cash’s other early work (Interiors comes to mind) – remains to my ears as vital and fresh as her more recent work, including The List. And the heart of King’s Record Shop remains “Runaway Train.” The song was written by John Stewart, and Cash’s recording of it peaked at No. 1 on the country charts.

A Six-Pack from the Ultimate Jukebox, No. 17
“Suspicious Minds” by Elvis Presley, RCA Victor 47-9764 [1969]
“My Impersonal Life” by Blue Rose, Epic 10811 [1972]
“China Grove” by the Doobie Brothers, Warner Bros. 7728 [1973]
“#9 Dream” by John Lennon, Apple 1878 [1975]
“Time” by the Alan Parsons Project from The Turn of a Friendly Card [1981]
“Runaway Train” by Rosanne Cash, Columbia 07988 [1987]

A while back, I picked up Suspicious Minds, a two-disc collection of the work Elvis Presley did at American Studios in Memphis in early 1969, the sessions that resulted in Presley’s three greatest singles – “Suspicious Minds,” “Kentucky Rain” and “In the Ghetto” – as well as a wealth of other great material. And I was going to comb through the booklet that came with the collection to find a quote or some other tidbit to use here this morning. But the booklet is printed in small white type on black and is for practical purpose unreadable without using a magnifying glass. I have one of those, but I also have better ways to invest my time. So I’ll just say that “Suspicious Minds” – which went to No. 1 in the autumn of 1969 – is to me the best thing Presley ever recorded during his long and erratic career. That’s a hefty statement to make about someone who had 114 records in the Top 40, but to my ears, the body of work from those Memphis sessions was better – in most cases, far better – than anything Presley had done since the Sun sessions during the mid-1950s. And “Suspicious Minds” was the best of all.

“My Impersonal Life” is likely better known for the cover version done by Three Dog Night. The Blue Rose version – the song was written by Terry Furlong of Blue Rose – came to my attention through a CBS compilation called The Music People, one of those classic collections record labels used to sell cheaply to promote new artists and albums. From there, I found Blue Rose’s self-titled 1972 album, and after I ripped and posted that album – this was almost three years ago – I found myself connecting with Dave Thomson, who’d played bass and guitar for the group. Dave has since passed on, and when “My Impersonal Life” pops up these days, I find myself thinking about connections found and lost and the multiple layers of life and the sheer impermanence of things. And then I hear the first line of the chorus – “Be still and know that everything’s all right” – and I’m okay.

It’s become a cliché, I suppose, to call the Doobie Brothers’ “China Grove” one of the great road trip songs of all time. But it’s still true. If I’m not driving when the song pops up on the player, I wish I were. And if I’m out running errands and the record – which went to No. 15 during the autumn of 1973 – comes on the radio, I generally keep moving until it’s over, even if I have to drive around the block an extra time. I should note that sometime during one of our visits to Texas, the Texas Gal and I will likely go to the little town of China Grove just east of San Antonio with the CD player blaring as we cross the town line. Not like that hasn’t been done a million times since 1973, but I’ve never done it.

The dreamy and mystical soundscape of John Lennon’s “#9 Dream” still captures me, more than thirty-five years after its release. I’m not sure what it all means, but it doesn’t really matter. Evidently Lennon wasn’t sure what it all meant, either: Wikipedia says that, according to May Pang, Lennon’s companion at the time, “the phrase repeated in the chorus, ‘Ah! böwakawa poussé, poussé’, came to Lennon in a dream and has no specific meaning. Lennon then wrote and arranged the song around his dream”. Pang, by the way, provides the whispered female vocals on the record, which went to No. 9 in early 1975.

I don’t know a lot of the work of Alan Parsons, either solo or as the leader of the Alan Parsons Project, which is just another example of the world containing too much music to know. But I recall getting lost in “Time” when it came out of the radio speakers during the summer of 1981 on its way to No. 15. It’s a record that’s perhaps pretty and sentimental to excess – and I perhaps have a weakness for things pretty and sentimental – but it seemed at the time so much better than the music that surrounded it on the radio. (The records that bracketed “Time” when it peaked at No. 15 in July 1981 were “Endless Love” by Diana Ross and Lionel Richie and “Touch Me When We’re Dancing” by the Carpenters.) And I still like it almost thirty years later.