Posts Tagged ‘Freda Payne’

What’s At No. 100? (1-15-1972)

Tuesday, January 15th, 2019

Here’s the Billboard Hot 100 for January 15, 1972, forty-seven years ago today:

“American Pie (Parts 1 & 2)” by Don McLean
“Brand New Key” by Melanie
“Let’s Stay Together” by Al Green
“Sunshine” by Jonathan Edwards
“Family Affair” by Sly & The Family Stone
“Scorpio” by Dennis Coffey & The Detroit Guitar Band
“I’d Like To Teach The World To Sing (In Perfect Harmony)” by the New Seekers
“Got To Be There” by Michael Jackson
“Hey Girl/I Knew You When” by Donny Osmond
“Clean Up Woman” by Betty Wright

So what did I think about those eleven records back then, when I was just into my second quarter of college? Well, I liked “American Pie,” but generally heard the album track, not the bifurcated version on 45, which – if I remember things rightly – didn’t cover the entire track anyway. (I think our pal Yah Shure once detailed for us the history of the single vs. the album track, but I’m too lazy this early afternoon to go find that comment.)

I also liked “Let’s Stay Together,” even before hearing it during a sweet afternoon with a young lady a few weeks after this chart came out. And I kind of liked the Melanie single – with its winking naughtiness – and the Jonathan Edwards record. I was okay with the New Seekers record, too, although these days, the first thing that comes to mind when I hear “I’d Like To Teach The World To Sing” is Don Draper.

I don’t recall ever hearing either of the Donny Osmond sides. If so, I would have cringed. Nor am I sure if – in 1972 – I’d ever heard Freddie Scott’s original version of “Hey Girl” or Billy Joe Royal’s version of “I Knew You When,” which charted in 1963 and 1965, respectively. (Royal’s record was a cover of Wade Flemons’ 1964 original.)

As to the other records in that Top Ten, I didn’t care about them then. I’ve changed my mind on a couple: “Family Affair” and “Clean Up Woman” are in my iPod along with the records by Don McLean, Al Green, Jonathan Edwards and the New Seekers. I know that “Scorpio” scratches an itch for some of my friends, but it doesn’t do anything for me. And the Melanie single no longer appeals (although thinking about it as I write, I can hear it clearly in my head).

With that done, let’s dive to the bottom of that 1972 Hot 100, and there we find the last charting single for Freda Payne, best remembered for “Band Of Gold” (No. 3 in 1970) and for “Bring The Boys Home” (No. 12 in 1971). “The Road We Didn’t Take” is a decent soul ballad, produced by the team of Holland-Dozier-Holland for their Invictus label. But it pretty much went nowhere, spending two weeks at No. 100 and then disappearing.

We’re Back In 1970 Again

Friday, May 28th, 2010

This morning, I thought I’d sneak a look at the Billboard Hot 100 from this week in 1970 and see what might be found there. I was finishing my junior year of high school and was heading into my last year of summer freedom. The only remunerative work I would do that summer would be the four days I spent in the trap pits at the state trapshoot; in 1970, I would get sixty dollars for four days of dirty, somewhat dangerous work at the gun club.

Other than that, and the normal run of backyard chores, the summer was mine. I don’t recall that I had any special plans for it, just a lot of hanging around on the front porch and in the basement rec room. And looking back, I don’t recall that all that much happened.

But whatever did happen, music was no doubt a large part it. Here’s the Top Ten from May 30, 1970:

“Everything Is Beautiful” by Ray Stevens
“American Woman/No Sugar Tonight” by the Guess Who
“Love On A Two-Way Street” by the Moments
“Cecelia” by Simon & Garfunkel
“Up Around The Bend/Run Through The Jungle” by Creedence Clearwater Revival
“Which Way You Goin’ Billy” by the Poppy Family Featuring Susan Jacks
“The Letter” by Joe Cocker
“Turn Back The Hands Of Time” by Tyrone Davis
“Vehicle” by the Ides of March
“Let It Be” by the Beatles

Well, nothing there is truly awful except maybe “Which Way You Goin’ Billy,” although even after forty years, I am still weary of “Everything Is Beautiful.” The one record from that list that could likely use some more airplay is the Moments’ gorgeous “Love On A Two-Way Street.”

Oddly, I do not have that recording on either vinyl, CD or mp3, so I will have to assume that the video below includes the LP version. The record was the first of three hits for the Moments, and it was by far the most successful, peaking at No. 3 in the Top 40 and spending five weeks at the top of the R&B chart.

A little further down the list, at No. 37, we find a sad tale of a new marriage quickly gone bad. This was the first of fifteen weeks that Freda Payne’s “Band of Gold” would be in the Top 40, and it would peak at No. 3. (Through one of those bits of luck that sometimes happen, my copy of LP, Band of Gold, is autographed. I bought it at a garage sale from one of a quartet of sisters who had seen Payne perform in later years and had brought along the LP. The LP also includes “Deeper and Deeper,” which went to No. 24 in the autumn of 1970.)

The next title that caught my eye was “So Much Love” by a group called Faith, Hope & Charity, a Tampa trio whose tale is told here. “So Much Love” was at No. 70 in the last week of May. It went to No. 14 on the R&B chart and – to my ears – should have done much better than No. 51 on the Hot 100, which is where it spent the second and third weeks of July before falling back down the Hot 100.

And finally this morning, here’s a record I once quoted but I don’t think I ever posted it: “Freedom Blues” by Little Richard. It was part of the work he did for Reprise in the early 1970s: three released albums and one put on the shelves. The record peaked at No. 47 during the week of July 11, 1970, and two weeks later it was gone from the Hot 100. “Freedom Blues” did a little better on the R&B chart, peaking at No. 28.

See you tomorrow!