Posts Tagged ‘Larry Jon Wilson’

Some Friday Songs

Friday, June 8th, 2018

When I sort the 72,000 tracks in the RealPlayer for “Friday,” the returns are not encouraging: I get twenty-two tracks. Two of them are set aside immediately: They’re performances of “Remedy” and “Willie McTell” by The Band during 1994 on the NBC show Friday Night Videos.

The other twenty tracks, however, provide an interesting mix, though I think we’ll pass by the theme from the television show Friday Night Lights by W.G. “Snuffy” Walden. So what we’ll do is sort the other nineteen tracks by their running time, set the cursor in the middle of the stack and find four tracks.

And we start with a churning, loping and somewhat dissonant boogie decorated by one of those odd lyrical excursions typical of Steely Dan: “Black Friday” from the 1975 album Katy Lied:

When Black Friday comes
I fly down to Muswellbrook
Gonna strike all the big red words
From my little black book

Gonna do just what I please
Gonna wear no socks and shoes
With nothing to do but feed
All the kangaroos

When Black Friday comes I’ll be on that hill
You know I will

I’m not an expert on Steely Dan, though I enjoy the group’s music almost any time I hear it and recognize the skill and talent on display. But the artistic visions of Walter Becker and Donald Fagen almost always leave me a little off-kilter, as if – to use an idea I think I’ve expressed at other times describing other artists – I’m suddenly living in a world of eighty-nine degree angles.

The first moments of the next track are oddly similar to “Black Friday,” but then the tune slides into the familiar jangly sound of “Friday On My Mind” by the Easybeats, a 1967 hit that peaked at No. 16 in the Billboard Hot 100. The tune has its own moments of dissonance as it tell the tale of a fellow enduring another week of work or school, looking for the weekend so he can get to the city and spend time with his gal: “She’s so pretty!”

So were the Easybeats a one-hit wonder? It depends on how you define the term. I’ve seen some chartheads define a one-hit wonder as a group that had only one record reach the Hot 100. I tend to think that’s a bit stringent, and use the qualifier of only one hit in the Top 40. Why discuss that here? Because the Easybeats had one other record in the Hot 100: a 1969 release titled “St. Louis” that spent one week at No. 100 and then dropped off the chart.

By my terms, then, the Easybeats – who hailed from Sydney, Australia – are definitely a one-hit wonder. Their hit is a record I’m not particularly fond of, but there it was at No. 16 during the spring of 1967.

Larry Jon Wilson, who died in 2010, was a Southern storyteller whose songs never seemed to hurry, even when they clipped right along. “Friday Night Fight At Al’s” fits into that style very well. I found it on an album titled Testifying: The Country Soul Revue, a 2004 sampler put out in the United Kingdom by the Casual Records label. (Among the other artists on the album were Tony Joe White, Bonnie Bramlett and Dan Penn.)

The track starts with Wilson’s laconic explanation that Al’s Beer Depot was a bar out near the bomb factory, a place where he went for a banquet one Friday when things went as they normally did at Al’s:

The Friday night fights at Al’s place: The situation was grim and I was forced to face
The extreme possibility of no one ever seein’ me alive again
When the night was over, chairs are busted, tables are flyin’
Get me out of here, Jesus, I’m afraid of dyin’
It’s the Friday night fights at Al’s place . . . We didn’t have no referee

Wilson’s body of work is a little thin: Four albums between 1975 and 1979, another in 2008, and a few other things here and there, two of which are included on Testifying. I like his stuff a lot.

Our fourth stop today brings us the Tulsa sound of the late J.J. Cale, a shuffling tune titled simply “Friday,” a track from a 1979 album titled, with equal simplicity, 5. I’ve loved Cale’s work since I came across his first album, Naturally, back in 1972, a year after it came out. There is a sameness to his work, yes, but it’s a comfortable sameness, if that makes any sense.

In any case, just lean back and listen to “Friday.”

Six At Random

Tuesday, November 4th, 2014

We’re going to put the cursor about in the middle of the 78,829 mp3s in the RealPlayer and see where we go on a random six-track trip. Here we go!

First up is “When She Loves Me” from the 1977 album Mama Let Him Play by the Canadian musician Jerry Doucette. It’s a sweet tune, and I wouldn’t have known it or anything about Doucette without the help of my blogging pal jb, who hangs out at The Hits Just Keep On Comin’. He asked me one morning if I had Doucette’s album, needing – I think – the title track. I didn’t, so I went and found it in the wilds of the Internet. It’s a decent late Seventies album, offering kind of a Canadian version of Pablo Cruise, and it got to No. 159 on the Billboard 200. I don’t often seek the album out, but when a track from it pops up on random, I hum along.

From there, we move back to 1957 and “Love Roller Coaster” by Big Joe Turner. “I ain’t never comin’ down to earth,” he sings. “I’m gonna stay up high, long as I’m up here with you.” The record wasn’t one of Turner’s greatest hits, and it came near the end of his charting days – it was the next-to-last record he placed in the R&B Top 40 – but it got to No. 12, and it sounds pretty much like a Big Joe Turner joint. In other words, you know what you’re gonna get when the record starts, and when it ends, you’re not disappointed.

Coldplay first came to my attention in 2001 when “Yellow” showed up on the playlist of Twin Cities radio station Cities 97. I remember looking askance at the radio the first time I heard it, wincing at some of the lyrics, which seemed not so much haunting (which I think was the goal) as vague. But “Yellow” brought Coldplay to my attention, which is good, as I’ve liked a fair amount of the band’s work since then. I know there are many who detest the band, and I don’t quite get that. But then, there’s a lot of stuff I don’t get, so I don’t spend much time worrying about Coldplay haters.

I paid no attention to T. Rex back in the day, except that there was no way anyone could ignore “Bang A Gong (Get It On)” during early 1972. But I missed out on everything else the band did, including “Jeepster” from 1971’s Electric Warrior album. The record went to No. 2 in the U.K. but was not released as a U.S. single. I’m not entirely sure what “Girl, I’m just a Jeepster for your love” means, but the track is catchy. And it’s very similar to Howlin’ Wolf’s 1962 single “You’ll Be Mine.” Wikipedia notes that T. Rex’s Marc Bolan acknowledged of “Jeepster” that he “lifted it from a Howlin’ Wolf song.” (Regular reader Yah Shure has since told me that “Jeepster” was in fact released as a single in the U.S., though it did not chart. My source for my statement was The Great Rock Discography, another volume that I have either misread or whose data I must now salt liberally.)

The late Larry Jon Wilson has showed up in these pages a few times, and I’m glad to see him pop up today as we wander randomly. “Loose Change” is a panhandler’s tale, the title track from Wilson’s 1977 album, and he tells the tale as he seemingly always does, with affection, with respect, and with an acute eye for detail. He released five albums – four in the 1970s and one in 2008 – and every one of them is a quiet gem. And as I write this morning, I feel as if I should listen to his music more than I do, because every time Wilson’s music pops up randomly, I’m drawn into it by his craft and his warm voice.

Among my musical idiosyncrasies is an affection for the music of Julie London, the 1950s and 1960s chanteuse who’s perhaps known for two things: her 1955 recording of “Cry Me A River” and her role as nurse Dixie McCall in the 1970s police drama Emergency! Today’s random jaunt brings up London’s performance of “I’m Glad There Is You” from her 1955 album Julie Is Her Name. It’s a quiet track, maybe not among her best, but if you want to know what the adults were listening to in 1955, it’s a pretty good example.

Saturday Single No. 401

Saturday, July 12th, 2014

I spent just a little time this morning looking for something that connects with the day. I dug into a few Billboard Hot 100s from over the years, looked at games I might play with the date – 7/12 – and then sipped my coffee while the RealPlayer searched for “July 12” so I could see if anything was recorded on this date over the years.

There were a few tracks dated “July 12,” most of them, as I expected, folk and blues material from the 1930s and 1940s. (I have session dates for relatively few tracks among the 77,000 in the RealPlayer, and most of those come from annotated blues and folk anthologies.) And then I spotted the date “July The 12th” in a title.

The late Larry Jon Wilson has been mentioned in this space just twice in more than seven years, and that lack of attention surprises me, given how much I enjoy his music. The track that caught my attention this morning, “July The 12th, 1939,” is a sad and enigmatic Southern tale – and I wonder as I write if there are any Southern tales that are not sad and enigmatic – written by Norro Wilson and released on Wilson’s 1977 album Loose Change. And it’s today’s Saturday Single.

Saturday Single No. 195

Saturday, July 24th, 2010

As readers probably could guess, we’ve been preoccupied and our time has been preempted by the garden. As I write, the Texas Gal is in the kitchen, trimming and blanching for freezing several more quarts of wax beans and green beans; when she’s finished with that, our first cucumbers of the season will surrender to their fates as refrigerator pickles.

A couple of Saturdays ago, the two of us spent the morning reclaiming portions of the garden where we’d let weeds feel welcome. By the time we were sitting on the patio with cold beverages, our task completed for the morning, we were exhausted. I wondered then and I still wonder this morning how on earth my grandparents – my mom’s folks – thrived on a farm until they were far past what most of us would consider retirement age. One quarter of their days’ tasks would leave me on my back, too exhausted to even heft a beer glass.

So I know I’m not cut out for farm life, but that’s a judgment I could have made without the weeding exhaustion of the other week. I used to spend at least a couple weeks a summer on Grandpa’s farm, entertaining myself during the early years as Mom, Grandma and my aunt canned fruit, cooked and froze vegetables, made jams and jellies and then plucked, cleaned, cooked and preserved – either by canning or freezing – up to twenty chickens. In the later years that my grandparents were on the farm, of course, I ended up plucking chickens and serving as errand boy, hauling fresh vegetables from the garden to the house and bringing into the kitchen supplies bought in town.

Just from those brief experiences at the farm just outside the small town of Lamberton, I’ve known for years that the agricultural life is not for me. Oh, I’m enjoying our garden, even though some of the effort can be taxing. But it’s a hobby, not our livelihood. And for that, I am glad.

Still, I think that the glimpses I got of farm life when I was young were valuable. I’ve always known where milk came from – I think most of my peers in elementary school did, but I’m not entirely sure – and as long as I can remember, I’ve been aware of the effort it takes to raise food from the earth. And I admire those whose temperaments fit the demands of that life.

My grandparents – and my aunt with them – had those temperaments. For more than fifty years, first on a farm near another small town, Wabasso, and then on the farm I knew outside Lamberton, they thrived. As you might guess, my mom and I have been sorting through more pictures this week, and some of those in the box we’re working on show the last Christmas on the farm and our first visit to the house they moved to in Lamberton.

I recall that first visit to the house in town. It felt utterly wrong. The furniture was the same, as were the furnishings: the dishes and all the other tools of daily life. But seeing those things, and seeing my grandparents and my aunt in a different setting was unsettling. And I managed to realize that if it was unsettling and felt utterly wrong for me, who’d only visited for portions of my eighteen years, then it had to feel so much more wrong and unsettling for my grandparents and my aunt. It might have been my first real exposure to the fact that life has cycles and seasons and we have to make our ways through them, changing and learning as we go.

I won’t say I knew exactly what my grandparents and aunt were feeling, but a few years later, on his 1979 album Sojourner, the recently deceased Larry Jon Wilson nailed it pretty well in his song “The Farm,” and that’s today’s Saturday Single.