What’s At No. 100? (June 1976)

Here’s the Billboard Top Ten records for the first week of June 1976. We’re going to talk about them a little bit and then drop to the bottom of the chart and see what was at No. 100 that week.

“Love Hangover” by Diana Ross
“Silly Love Songs” by Wings
“Get Up And Boogie (That’s Right)” by Silver Convention
“Misty Blue” by Dorothy Moore
“Happy Days” by Pratt & McLain
“Shannon” by Henry Gross
“Welcome Back” by John Sebastian
“Sara Smile” by Daryl Hall & John Oates
“Shop Around” by the Captain & Tennille
“Fool To Cry/Hot Stuff” by the Rolling Stones

Boy, forty-five years later, I really like only one of those: Moore’s heart-breaking, lovelorn “Misty Blue.”  As I wrote not quite three years ago:

From the opening piano cascades and Moore’s first “Ooooooooh” through the last “My whole world turns misty blue” three-and-a-half minutes later, this record reminds anyone who hears it exactly how it was, at least once, maybe twice, maybe three times in a lifetime. Anyone who’s truly lived has been in that misty blue world. And it’s a good thing to be reminded of that once in a while.

As for the rest, there are some virtues: “Silly Love Songs” has a world-class bass line, but is really just another McCartney trifle (this time about writing trifles). “Sara Smile” is sweet. “Fool To Cry” has a great Jagger vocal, but I can take or leave the flip side. The Captain & Tennille manage not to offend the Miracles with their cover of “Shop Around.” And silly as it is, “Get Up And Boogie (That’s Right)” was fun as the disco era was dawning.

I didn’t care about “Love Hangover” one way or another (and still don’t), but “Happy Days,” “Shannon,” and “Welcome Back” were all records that make me push the button for another station. (Actually, “Shannon” popped up the other day when I was taking a nap with the cable company’s Seventies channel on in the background. I heard the opening, groaned, rolled over and went back to sleep.)

And these days? I was stunned to find that none of those eleven records was in the iPod, the source of my day-to-day listening. I quickly added “Misty Blue,” and my work there was done. “Silly Love Songs” and “Fool To Cry” might be added later today.

Digging deeper into the Hot 100 from forty-five years ago this week, we’ll stop at No. 100, where we find a record I’ve never heard before: “Touch & Go” by the group Ecstasy, Passion & Pain, featuring Barbara Roy. It’s a dance outing with a decent instrumental backing, but boy, Roy’s vocals are lacking, being by turns strained and uncertain of pitch.

The R&B/dance group came out of New York City, and before adding “featuring Barbara Roy” to the credits, it had one record bubble under and then three entries reach the Hot 100, with “One Beautiful Day” hitting No. 48 in the spring of 1975. “Touch & Go,” the group’s last charting record, moved up to No. 98 the next week and then was gone.

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One Response to “What’s At No. 100? (June 1976)”

  1. David says:

    Welcome back America! Maybe pandemic commercials should be your next deep dive as in the Applebee’s commercial, Welcome Back https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yVsDNryMwCs

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